Cold War

Daniel Williams: How Politics Has Changed

Broadcast Running Time: 27:12

John Loeffler

April 1, 2022

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A new book is out about how the 1976 election signaled a sea change in American politics.  Joining us today is the author of that book, Daniel Williams (westga.edu), Professor of History at the University of West Georgia.  He describes the shift in electoral maps, party policies, and the thinking of the country in general that began in 1976 that has resulted in what we’re seeing today.  He goes on to chat about the Catholic Church and the changes that have befallen it since the late 1960s.

Build Back Inflation

Broadcast Running Time: 01:17:14

John Loeffler

October 30, 2021

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Given the policies that the current administration has put in place, it's not a shock that inflation is picking up. But some in government and the media are telling us it's not a problem. First up this week is Bruce Yandle (mercatus.org), Distinguished Adjunct Fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. He draws on his previous experience at the top of the Federal Trade Commission to predict when our economic tipping point will be if we don't fix things now. He also shows us what a Bruce Yandle-led Federal Reserve would do to solve the problem.

The Democrat Party is the party in charge right now, causing this inflation. But prior to our last election, several political forecasters were betting the party would soon come to an end. Is that prediction still valid after the election? Bob Adelmann (thenewamerican.com), retired entrepreneur and conservative columnist, is here to answer that. He describes why the party would disappear in a few years and gives an early prediction as to how the 2022 midterm elections will turn out for both houses of Congress.

Finally this week, we take a look at why the catchphrase ‘Build Back Better' is an empty slogan that's actually accomplishing nothing. Joining us is Seton Motley (lessgovernment.org), Founder and President of the group Less Government. He looks at how everything fits together from our supply chain issues to China's rise after the fall of the Soviet Union to Chinese influence in our college education system. He finishes up weighing in on the future of pandemic-related issues in this country.

Seton Motley: Build Back Never

Broadcast Running Time: 19:23

John Loeffler

October 26, 2021

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The catchphrase of the year so far is 'Build Back Better,' a slogan our current administration keeps insisting we're following. To most people, though, nothing is better. Back with us today after a long hiatus is Seton Motley (lessgovernment.org), Founder and President of the group Less Government. Why is the plan seemingly to destroy the country and our economy rather than build back better? He looks at how everything fits together from our supply chain issues to China's rise after the fall of the Soviet Union to Chinese influence in our college education system. He even weighs in on the pandemic and where we're headed in this country.

Does history really repeat itself?  Can we learn from it?  David Satter (davidsatter.com), Editorial Author at the Wall Street Journal, joins us to report on his experiences as a journalist in Soviet Russia in the 1970s and 1980s – and compare it to America today.  In the Soviet Union, media perpetuated the government narrative so much so that the people knew that news stories weren't true.  Today in the U.S., we read or hear a story and immediately think, based on the media outlet, that an ideology is being pushed instead of facts.  Also, in totalitarian societies, there is such a threat to disrupt your future, through cancel culture or force, that people self-censor and fall in line.  It happened in the Soviet Union.  We're seeing it begin to happen here.  Can we learn from this in time to stop it?

Navigating the Turbulent Waters

Broadcast Running Time: 1:18:31

John Loeffler

August 8, 2020

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Our biggest geopolitical threat today is not Russia as the media would have you believe; it is China. Joining us is Captain James Fanell (www.gcsp.ch), Retired U.S. Naval Intelligence Director, who draws on his experience and knowledge of China, examining China's goal of world domination by 2049, their battle with us in the space race, and their military strategy around the world.

This week we recognized the 75th anniversary of the dropping of the first atomic bomb on Japan in 1945. Tom Lewis (www.tomlewis4.wixsite.com), retired officer of the Royal Australian Navy, joins us to discuss his new book, Atomic Salvation, about how dropping the A-bomb may have saved millions of lives. The narrative about whether or not it was a good idea to drop the bombs has changed dramatically over the years.

Next, we play a clip from John's appearance on KYMS radio last weekend where he and host, Lee Lancaster, chat about the church and how it has handled crises, both in the past and in today's turbulent times.

There is a reason for the turbulent times, but it can be a bit overwhelming to try and make sense of it all. We wrap up the show this week with John's boralogue, where he details the stages Marxists and postmodernists go through to destroy our country. It's getting to a point where we can no longer hunker down and hope the chaos passes us by. We need to stand up for what is right before it's too late.

Tom Lewis: Atomic Salvation

Broadcast Running Time: 24:11

John Loeffler

August 6, 2020

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Seventy-five years ago today, the U.S. dropped the first of two atom bombs on Japan, eventually bringing about the end of WWII. Tom Lewis, retired officer of the Royal Australian Navy, joins us to discuss his new book, Atomic Salvation, about how dropping the A-bomb may have saved millions of lives. There was debate and secrecy involved in the operation leading up to the bombs dropping.

Dr. Lewis looks at how the narrative flipped from dropping the bombs was a good thing to it being absolutely horrible. It has largely to do with the passage of time and forgetting the horrors of war. Young people are not taught how horrible totalitarian governments have been. It makes them harder to recognize when they begin to form again.