Learning from History

Some of you may remember the movie El Cid from 1961 starring Charlton Heston. Can we learn anything from the real story of El Cid? Back with us today is Raymond Ibrahim (raymondibrahim.com), Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center. He recounts the history of battles between Muslims from North Africa and Christians in Spain, including during the time of El Cid. Learning this helps to understand how Western Civilization developed, how Christianity was treated throughout the years, and why we are where we are today. It is important to get the accurate historical context in order to correctly understand history and have intelligent, fact-based, and rational conversations about it.

John flies solo today, digging deep into the archives of media history to play a speech given in 1938 by American politician Lewis Schwellenbach (D-WA). Why is he playing this speech? To show the similarities and differences between what happened with Hitler overrunning Austria in 1938 and what Putin is doing in Ukraine today. There are many similarities with what politicians and the media were saying then and now. The primary difference is that today, we are far more connected globally and unable to take an isolationist stance like we could back then. It's important to learn lessons from history and apply them to today.

Matthew Young: Unsettled Science

Broadcast Running Time: 21:11

We hear two mantras often when it comes to science: the science is settled, and science and faith cannot and should not interact. Joining us today is Matthew Young (hillsdale.edu), Dean of Natural Sciences and Professor of Chemistry at the vaunted Hillsdale College. He pushes back on the idea that people of faith are not thinking people and that faith and science should not work together. After all, God created the awesome and wonderful things that scientists study. Professor Young also describes what Hillsdale College is doing to encourage open dialogue in science so people are free to explore and debate and get to the truth without political or ideological pressure.

The Context of Our Times

Broadcast Running Time: 01:19:33

John Loeffler

April 30, 2022

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After much outrage over CRT, it seemed to have faded into obscurity. But news of a Missouri school district including questions in a math assignment related to sexual activity has raised questions about its return. First up this week, we welcome to the show Andrea Widburg (americanthinker.com), Deputy Editor at American Thinker. She looks at how this one example points to a much bigger problem: school curricula are still rife with woke lies about history along with vivid sexual depictions. Thankfully, most parents – and even a few on the left – are not fooled and are beginning to see the truth. Is wokus pokus in schools finally being drowned out by the truth?

Many in younger generations today rely on Google to look up the truth about history or other issues. The problem with that is: how do you know what you're finding is actually true? John flies solo in this segment, examining how much of what Google purports to be fact is often taken out of context. You need to understand facts in context in order to understand why people behave the way they do. Knowing human nature and applying it to history gives you a much clearer, fact-based look at our past, rather than the wokus pokus version we often see. This will help our children in schools as they wade through the waters of indoctrination.

Finally this week, we take a brief look at one of the latest political scandals: the Hunter Biden laptop. Joining us is Lloyd Billingsley (independent.org), Policy Fellow at the Independent Institute. He discusses the further downfall of the intelligence community after current and former IC members published a letter incorrectly denouncing the laptop story as disinformation. The CIA and FBI have become politicized for one side and while doing so have neglected their real job, which is keeping the nation safe.

John Loeffler

April 28, 2022

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It's important when studying history or looking up facts to understand the situation in context, otherwise everything gets clouded with judgment. John flies solo on today's podcast, recalling times where he was confronted with a problem and then drew upon conversations he had or books he read in the past in order to come up with a solution. When you Google facts, a lot of times the results are out of context. You need to understand facts in context in order to understand why people behave the way they do. Knowing human nature and applying it to history gives you a much clearer, fact-based look at our past, rather than the wokus-pokus version we often see. A good lesson for not only us but also our children.

For a couple of weeks, we had no idea what had become of our Ukraine-based expert Reuben Johnson. Had he escaped Kiev? Was he injured or dead? Thankfully, we received a call from him letting us know what had happened. He is with us today to share his incredible tale – one that involves his car being destroyed by machine gun fire! He also discusses conversations he has had and reports he's received regarding the mindset of both Russian and Ukrainian soldiers.

Cancel culture has gained a pervasive prominence in our society. How did it get to this point and is there a way to stop it? Joining us today is Mark Bauerlein (firstthings.com), Senior Editor at First Things and Professor Emeritus of English at Emory University. He describes how the millennial generation learned this cancelling behavior during their teenage years and then parlayed that knowledge to the campus and then to the workplace. While in school, woke educators taught a version of American history that projected America as a horrible place. It's easy to have a Marxist, cancel culture mindset after that. He also points out that many Christian denominations have fallen prey to this mindset as well. But if enough of us stand up, call it out, and reject it, we can put a stop to it.

Heather MacDonald: Nightmare at the Museum

Broadcast Running Time: 26:45

John Loeffler

March 14, 2022

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'Go Woke, Go Broke' has been primarily associated with companies, but now it seems like museums are being affected. Joining us today is Heather MacDonald (manhattan-institute.org), Thomas W. Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute. She describes how the Art Institute of Chicago, along with other museums in the U.S., are trying to diversify by firing their current docents – due to overwhelming whiteness – and hiring new ones based solely on skin color and ethnicity. But when they say they have a problem with 'whiteness,' what they really mean is that they have a problem with Western Civilization. And when a museum is at odds with that, not only could donations take a hit, but also their whole reason for being is called into question.

Paul Rosenberg: Rooting in and for Reality

Broadcast Running Time: 30:41

John Loeffler

February 17, 2022

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Too many people today refuse to face reality and it always causes problems until that reality becomes real. What should we be teaching our children so they avoid those problems? Back with us today to go over this is author and cryptography expert Paul Rosenberg (freemansperspective.com). He advocates for teaching children how to think through a problem, always basing thoughts on reality and working out from there. If you're based on truth and reality, then you can consider the validity of other ideas. Reality always becomes real – it's best to root yourself there.

Whenever you see a list of the ten best presidents in U.S. history, Abraham Lincoln almost always comes in at number one. And with exception to the Gettysburg Address, his most important speech may have been his second inaugural address. Joining us today to talk about this is Diana Schaub (loyola.edu), Professor of Political Science at Loyola University Maryland in Baltimore. She examines Lincoln's humility, his desire to move away from vengeance once the war was over, his use of religion in the speech, and his need to unite a divided country. She and John also look at the spirit of 1776 versus the hopelessness of 1619.