Utopian Thinking

Breaking Up With Power Is Hard To Do

Broadcast Running Time: 1:56:04

John Loeffler

April 11, 2020

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How has utopian thinking fared during this virus crisis? In this week’s boralogue, John looks at how the utopian ideologies of the European Union are being forced and held down in order to try to make them work. But reality keeps rearing its stubborn head. This crisis has highlighted that bureaucrats will always behave like bureaucrats, but you have to end-run bureaucracy in order to get anything constructive done.

Potpourri show this week – first guest is Steve Byas (www.oklahomaconstitution.com), Professor of History and Government at Randall University in Oklahoma. He examines the possibility of our temporary suspension of freedoms lasting longer than the crisis and whether it will be used as a precedent in the future.

Then we look at the threat from China with Steven Mosher (www.pop.org), President of the Population Research Institute, who discusses the geopolitical danger with China as well as the irony of how those who are politically correct will defend China despite the human rights abuses committed there.

Will this crisis affect state primary elections now or the federal election in November? Jason Snead (www.honestelections.org), Executive Director of the Honest Elections Project, analyzes the postponement process and covers voter ID, suppression, and fraud.

There are hot spots of religious persecution around the world, but Europe seems to be hotter than most. Dexter Van Zile (www.camera.org), Christian Media Analyst for CAMERA, shows how both Christians and Jews are being persecuted in Europe and highlights a TV host’s incorrect information on Iran.

Rounding out the program this week, John looks at a variety of topics including political correctness and its tendency to harm us, how statistics inform decisions which inform statistics, and the slowly fading narrative of anthropogenic global warming during this pandemic.

John's quote of the week:
“During this time, much of what governments will do will be unconstitutional. We have to be careful that these things do not become prolonged and then permanently embedded. Typically when rights go away, they for some reason just don’t seem to come back. Why? Because rights are a restriction on government.”

On this week's extra segment, we play another double feature. First up, Robert Haddock from October 2014 on Chinese economic and military expansion. We then transition to Joshua Philipp from July 2016 on the China threat, including espionage and disinformation. These interview are interesting for their time and even more so now in the light of the coronavirus threat that originated in China.